European Ancestors – Migration Series (6) – Creating a Better Life

European Migration Series
© Julie Goucher, August 2022

This post is part of a series about European Migration. You can read the complete series HERE.

This is a much less specific migration move, in terms of reasons, locations and even purpose. Migrating for a better life is very personable.

Let us look back at the position of Europe. Between 1550 and 1770 there was significant exploration to other parts of the world, with Spain and Portugal leading the way. In addition to Spain and Portugal, the Netherlands, France and Britain began exploration and claiming territory as their own.

That claiming of territory meant that nationals of that country had the scope of being able to migrate, either in with a permanent aim, or even in part, though that depended on the employment that was being undertaken. Some commonality between all five countries above, was the establishing of colonies in the Americas, or what we would class now as north America (Canada included), and south America or what is seen as Latin America.

North America provided the opportunity for migration; establishing communities who wanted more opportunity and more freedom. Over the decades there were many migrants to America, whether that was to the New England region or elsewhere in the country. Some were tempted by religious freedom, others by acquiring land through Land Grants, or just the ability to achieve something that was better than in the native country.

Over the coming weeks as this series develops and expands, we will examine some specific reasons, or migration groups.

About Julie Goucher

Genealogist, Author, Presenter, native Guildfordian, avid note taker and journal writer. Lover of Books, Stationery & History; Surnames, Butcher & Orlando One-Name Studies. Pharos Tutor for all One-Name Studies/surname courses as well as Researching Ancestors from Continental Europe.
This entry was posted in European Ancestors, European Migration Series, Europeans beyond Europe. Bookmark the permalink.

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