Surname Research – Variants

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Created by Julie Goucher 2019

When I registered the surname of Butcher with the Guild of One-Name Studies back in 2016 I had already been working on the surname.

Not just my own links to the surname, but also the other facets of the study, and in particular the distribution of the surname across both the UK and the world.

Initially I did not register any variants, that was until I came across a divorce record for a couple with the surname Butchers. I had been placidly recording the Butchers references from the various databases and documents for years, just in case. As I read through the divorce record the male advised that he had married under the surname of Butcher and that was incorrect, his surname was Butchers. I then did a quick check of the data on FreeBMD for the surname Butchers.

From that information I drew the conclusion that Butchers was a corruption of the surname Butcher I therefore added it to my registration. All has been well with the study, until today…..

I came across an obituary for the surname BACHAR in a west country newspaper. I wondered if that could be a variant from the surname of Butcher taking into account a potential strong accent from the west country. I made a note of the obit, adding it to my database. I then did a quick check on FreeBMD, entering on the surname and searching all events and all England and Wales.

The results were interesting. There were 16 references across England and Wales, none before 1962. The results were also spread out, Devon, Oxford, Hampstead and parts of Essex. At this point I am going to include them in a separate database and upload to the Butcher website. Just from some of the first names, I suspect this is a Jewish family but only time and research will tell.

 

Posted in Archive - Imported from Blogger, Butcher One-Name Study, DNA & Surname Projects, Genealogy, One-Name Studies | Leave a comment

Dear Kath, Love Ron: Letters 1937 to 1946 Edited by Mike Spathaky

Dear Kath, Love Ron

Image courtesy of  the author, Mike Spathaky

A day or so ago I received an email from a fellow member of the Guild of One-Name Studies, Mike Spathaky.

The reason for the note was to let me know that his book, Dear Kath, Love Ron will be available from later this month. The book is the publication of the letters between his parents, during the period of 1937-1946 which is of course through the turbulence of the Second World War

I have not personally read the book, but I have ordered one which I have paid for. Copies of the book can be ordered directly from Mike via the book website which is linked above and from Amazon.

For those in the UK within easy distance of Leicester, Mike is hosting a book signing in WH Smith bookshop on Saturday 19 October.  Here is what Mike had to say:

There will be a launch and book-signing session this Saturday, 19th October 2019, from 12.30. to 3.30. p.m. at WH Smith bookshop, Fosse Park, Leicester LE19 1HY. (Free parking and not far from the M1 and M69 junction.) Please come and support this event if you are at all near enough to Leicester. It will be really good to meet old friends and make new ones.

Mike has a fascinating One-Name Study, for the surname of Spathaky, which is a surname of Greek origins.

Posted in DNA & Surname Projects, Genealogy, One-Name Studies, Surnames | Leave a comment

Researching Surnames – A Guide to One-Name Studies.

Cover for Surname bookletOver the summer, I spent time working on a revised edition of the Surname Guide – A Guide to One-Name Studies.

The booklet will be available to purchase from the Guild of One-Name Studies and Amazon. The PDF version will be available to existing members of the Guild of One-Name Studies, free of charge just as soon as I have added it to the website.

It will also be available to new members, in their joining pack. The booklet is aimed at those new to One-Name Studies, but others perhaps might find it interesting, helpful or useful.

The previous version of this booklet was published in a shortened form and issued with all copies of Family Tree Magazine (April 2019 issue). Copies were also included in the delegate bags for attendees of the Guild’s 40th conference. Upon talking with one of the Guild’s Vice Presidents,  it was declared, that despite working on a study for 40 years, he had discovered something new!

Because the previous version had been so well received, it was suggested that a revised and expanded edition be written; this is that revised version.

Happy reading!

Posted in Books, Genealogy, One-Name Studies, Pharos - Introduction to One-Name Studies course | 2 Comments

Book Review – Son of Mine by Peter Papathanasiou

Son of MineIn this beautifully written memoir Peter Papathanasiou tells the story of two lives: his own, and that of his mother. From a starting point in modern Australia, the book reaches back to the period after the Second World War, focusing on the history of Greece (where the author was born) and Turkey, including the complexities of boundary changes and the effects that they have on religion, language, identity and the social, economic and political position of the affected population.

The author pieces together his life and that of his family in a gentle and authentic manner that embodies what family really means. He explores the potential challenges that arise from decisions made in previous generations, and the impacts that they can have on the next generation – and on generations in the future.

Papathanasiou tells a very personal story with respect, love and acknowledgement of those who went before him. This wonderful account demonstrates once and for all that sometimes family is about much more than genetics; it is about sacrifice and love, on many different levels.

This review was published in the October issue of Who Do You Think You Are? Magazine.

Posted in Book Reviews, Books, European Ancestors, Genealogy, Who Do You Think You Are? (WDYTYA?) Magazine | Leave a comment

Family Tree Magazine 2019 – Surname Research Series

FTM Nov 2019The November issue of Family Tree Magazine has recently been published, and the surname series continues, with us looking at preserving and publishing your One-Name Study.

There is a good deal of overlap between the publishing and preserving elements of the Seven Pillars and as I don’t have a lot of space in the column, I will be writing a bit more about the seven pillars and focusing on several of the questions that I find I am asked by those at the start of their One-Name Study journey. If you don’t want to wait for those posts you can read my numerous surname research posts HERE

Family Tree Magazine (UK) is available from magazine themselves as a print or digital version.

The Pharos Introduction course to One-Name Studies starts at the beginning of November, and whilst the majority of focus tends to be on surnames with a British background I am finding that more and more people are sharing their European genealogy and registering those surnames. Either way, if you are wanting to explore the depth of a study and to make sense of it, do consider joining us.

Posted in Family Tree Magazine (UK) Surname Series (2019), Genealogy, One-Name Studies, Pharos - Introduction to One-Name Studies course | Leave a comment

Red Hills – The Pitman’s Parliament

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Copyright Julie Goucher, September 2019

I recently had opportunity to visit Red Hills – The Pitman’s Parliament in the city of Durham. The home of the Durham Miner’s Association, the venue is usually closed to the public, open otherwise by appointment. I managed to attend during Heritage Week.

So what is Pitman’s Parliament? It is the name given to the building in Durham that represented the mining population in the County. For those with mining ancestors, it is an opportunity to gain some context to the backbreaking work that was undertaken by thousands of men, and in some cases children, in the north east of England. That said, if you are reading this from outside of the UK, there were other areas of the UK that had a mining workforce, but more on them another day.

The Durham Mining Association was a formal Trade Union, founded in 1869. It was though more than that to the workforce and it established itself as a powerful force with the mining community, indeed, the union of Durham mines formed a welfare system to support the workforce long before the Labour party did in 1945. Miners and their families benefited from accommodation for elderly or infirm miners, education for the younger generation, hospital provisions, a sick pay and unemployment benefit. The welfare halls were the centre of the communities and they provided a venue for events.

The building itself was opened in 1915 and is now not in the best of shape. That said, it is the home of what was a fascinating period of north east history and how this occupation was perceived in the County (and other areas) and how the community embraced the harshness of the work and times. When the venue opened in 1915 there was 120,000 members of the Durham Mining Association and they were organised into what are referred to as lodges, and there were 200 of them.

Inside there are a number of rooms that could be viewed and there were volunteers on hand to answer any questions or to point out things of particular interest.

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Copyright Julie Goucher ,September 2019

The Committee Room was a space where the meetings of the Executive were held. This room was closed to the public from its inception until the 1970’s when the it was opened by a wave of forward thinking, embracing a democratic principle.

Located in this room was two genealogical gems, the maps representing the mines across the County as a whole and the mines into their established geographical groups. Voting for the union officials, the people who sit in this room was not allowed until the 1960’s and the only voting undertaken by the members was for the agents. It was in this room that the discussions and decision took place for the Durham miners to participate in the National Miners Strike of 1984 and 1985.

Below are other photographs from this room:

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The Muniment Room was the room where the records and documents were kept. The room has a series of photographs of the former leaders, men loss in the various mining disasters and the only photograph of women – those who ventured to Russia in the early 1920’s.

The Pitman’s Parliament This the most impressive room in the building and it is here that you get a true sense of the context and layers of administration in looking after the welfare of the average and regular miner.

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This room is where the debating occurred between the men that represented each lodge. The men at the mines would appoint someone who would represent them. That person would sit in this room and would sit in the exact same seat each time they attended. There are about 200 seats in the lower level and higher level were for the public and press, although both groups were not always allowed, it depended on what was being debated.

Also on the lower level were the seats for the associated members, such as boiler men and engineers. As I walked about the room I spotted underneath the seats (which are like the folding ones that you find in cinema’s) a metal disc. The discs represent those commemorated at a specific mine or lodge. The date that was chosen was the 1951 record of lodges as there would be people who would recall those folk within living memory. If you had a family member who worked at a specific pit you could pay the donated amount of £100 and you would be presented with a disc in a presentation box and a copy of the disc which is for placing on the underside of the seat. The wording on the disc is chosen by the person making the donation, so it can be personalised.

On talking with the volunteer in this room there was a true and genuine sense of togetherness and community. The information provided and shared with me gave me a real sense of context. My husband has mining ancestors, the majority in Durham and some in Derbyshire. I know that they were represented by the man who sat in the relevant seats for Usworth and Washington. That man, did the best he could for the men and their families.

A story was relayed to me of a miner whose wife had died. He had no money to bury her with and was full of despair. The man who represented his pit went to a meeting the following day and shared the details with the men who sat in the Parliament room. That man left later that day with £400 by way of support. The man who shared that story with me did so to demonstrate the way of life and as he did so, his eyes fill with tears. It is very different to the scenes on the news that I recall from the time of the strike and suddenly I realise that it was not just news, it was something that certainly affected the lives of my husband’s ancestors and relatives, some of whom were still working in the mines during that time.

All images are the copyright of Julie Goucher, September 2019
Posted in Genealogy, History, Miners and Mining, Up North! | 1 Comment

Family Tree Magazine 2019 – Surname Research Series

FTM October 2019The October issue of Family Tree Magazine has recently been published, and the surname series continues, with us looking at the  fundamental principles of a study, as defined by the Guild of One-Name Studies, the Seven Pillars.

This issue focuses on analysing and synthesising data relating to a One-Name Study. As I don’t have a lot of space in the column, I will be writing a bit more about the seven pillars and focusing on several of the questions that I find I am asked by those at the start of their One-Name Study journey. If you don’t want to wait for those posts you can read my numerous surname research posts HERE

Family Tree Magazine (UK) is available from magazine themselves as a print or digital version.

The Pharos Introduction course to One-Name Studies starts at the beginning of November, and whilst the majority of focus tends to be on surnames with a British background I am finding that more and more people are sharing their European genealogy and registering those surnames. Either way, if you are wanting to explore the depth of a study and to make sense of it, do consider joining us.

Posted in Family Tree Magazine (UK) Surname Series (2019), Genealogy, One-Name Studies, Pharos - Introduction to One-Name Studies course | Leave a comment

Virtual Genealogical Association 2019 Conference

A few weeks ago I was asked to share the promote the following conference which is to be hosted by the Virtual Genealogical Association. It takes place in early November 2019. I will be speaking, although not live. My presentation is, “How European Surnames Can Help In Genealogical Research”. It looks a fascinating conference. If there are any questions, then please do contact me and I will look to incorporating the answers either in the presentation or via this site.

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Posted in Genealogy, One-Name Studies, Pharos - Introduction to One-Name Studies course, Presentations, Surnames | Leave a comment

1491 – The Untold Story of the Americas before Columbus

1491Launched daily from 9th August 2019 is this fascinating series commemorating the UN International Day of the World’s Indigenous Peoples.

Each episode is free to watch. Once the entire series has been shared via the series Facebook page, it is available to view via subscription, at the very reasonable price of $14.91 USD for the entire year. That equates to about £11.80. The website can be found HERE

I am not associated with the series, but have just watched the first two episodes and plan on watching the series. The writers, cast and directors were totally Indigenous.

Charles C MannBased on the book by Charles. C. Mann, the second edition was published in 2006.

Posted in Archive - Imported from Blogger, Genealogy, History | Leave a comment

RootsTech London 2019 Competition Closes and Winner Selected!

LondonBadges_1200x717pxAmbassadorAs a RootsTech London Ambassador I have the opportunity to host a give away for the event of a complimentary three day pass (worth £149). There was no restrictions on how I choose to host the give away.

I chose to ask those who entered to do one of two things – send me something for one of my studies or comment about a surname in their own family they were curious about.

My husband, Mr G was kind enough to dip his hand into a wicker basket that had been collecting the submissions and extract the winner. The winner is Janine Long – Congratulations Janine!

In the meantime, thanks to everyone who took part. I received several Butcher references for my study and those will be added to my database and I shall be in touch via email as I want to reference those researches as the source of the information. It was very interesting to read the comments and the surnames, so much so that I have decided that I am going to respond to those comments via this blog so please keep reading!

RootsTech London will take place 24-26 October 2019 at the Excel Centre, London.

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I shall be personally talking on Delving Deep into Migration, to and from the British Isles on Thursday.

The RootsTech website, for more information can be found HERE and the schedule is also available HERE.

Once again, thanks everyone for entering and sharing their surname queries.

Posted in RootsTech London 2019