Presentation – What to look for that suits your (One-Name/Surname) Study

After an issue with  Zoom, wanting to install a patch to fix an update problem which prevented me from giving this talk to the Guild of One-Name Studies on Wednesday, I arranged to record the presentation (click the image below).

The accompanying Handout – What to look at that suits your study is also available.

Copyright Julie Goucher, 2021 – Slide Template by Slide Carnival

I am planning to host an online discussion in the coming weeks, so if you wish to informed when it is schedule, please leave a comment, I will also share the information on this site.

For those interested in reading about and finding more information surnames:

Posted in Genealogy, Introduction to One-Name Studies (Pharos course 901), One-Name Studies, Practicalities of a One-Name Studies (Pharos Course 903), Presentations, Software and Applications, Surnames Series 2022 | 2 Comments

Census, Parish and One-Place Study Resources

Created by Julie Goucher, 2021 using Wordscloud

As we undertake our genealogical research, whether that it on our own individual family history, or a specific project, such as a One-Place Study, One-Name Study, or perhaps a project undertaken as part of the Family and Community History Research Society (FACHRS); we likely use a variety of resources to aid us. This post is a few of those resources that I find useful and recommend.

Posted in Genealogical Resources, Genealogy, Local History, One-Place Studies | Leave a comment

Census, People and Genealogy – 1911 Census

Created by Julie Goucher, 2021 using Wordscloud

Continuing with the Census, People and Genealogy series – all posts can be found HERE. There is also a Census downloadable to be found HERE.

The 1911 census was more comprehensive than earlier ones. For the first time it recorded nationality. There was also expanded information relating to occupation.

Married women were also asked specific questions. This was essentially an attempt to understand why the birth rate was falling, indeed it had been since the 1870’s. The questions were:

  • Duration of the current marriage
  • Number of children born within the marriage
    • It also counted those that were still living and those that were deceased.

The 1911 Census was also the first census where the government required the original forms to be retained. Those in the Army who were serving overseas were also recorded. The Great War begin in 1914, so this census is an important marker for those researching families where there was a loss within the family.

Following on from the last census (1901) where we saw my great Grandmother (Granny, as we all called her), Annie Prudence and her husband, my great Grandfather, Charles Butcher, we are now a decade on.

Here is the family – Charles and Annie, with their children, Rose who was responsible for sharing the stories and details of my family, Gladys, Percy, Arthur, George and Ellen. George was my Grandfather and I have written quite a lot about him over the years.

Census Returns of England and Wales, 1911. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA) Series RG14, 1911.

Census Returns of England and Wales, 1911. Kew, Surrey, England: The National Archives of the UK (TNA) Series RG14, 1911. (Schedule)

My Grandfather, George was aged three. He had not met my Grandmother, Lilian Matthews, which he obviously did, as they married in 1939 (sadly after the 1939 Register), though my Grandmother was not born yet, she arrived in December 1912.

What has become apparent to me as I have written this series, is how little I have researched my great Aunts and Uncles, and despite taking such an interest in my family, I have missed opportunities. Over the coming weeks and months, I intend to rectify that, in addition to researching the Butcher family in Alfold which I mentioned in the 1901 post. The Alfold Butcher family do connect to my Grandmother’s family though she did not know that, and there is still a connection between the two Butcher families, but that is something to unravel another day.

Posted in Butcher One-Name Study, Census, Genealogy, Puttenham & Wanborough, UK & Ireland (Eire) Genealogy Series | Leave a comment

Census, People and Genealogy – 1901 Census

Created by Julie Goucher, 2021 using Wordscloud

Continuing with the Census, People and Genealogy series – all posts can be found HERE. There is also a Census downloadable to be found HERE.

With the 1901 census we see a change to the questions asked on individuals on the census.

Firstly though, here is another great example of the description of the parish, demonstrating the depth of the description is variable because of the enumerators and how proceeded with their tasks of the census. The irony is that Puttenham, across the Hogs Back (A31) has more facilities and parishioners than Wanborough, of course, it could be because there was less households that the enumerators had more time to provide such details.

Wanborough Census 1901 – RG13/607/66/1 Surrey History Centre

The 1901 Census had expanded in terms of the data it sought, the new data is marked in yellow.

The first set of new questions, related to the building and whether the building was inhabited, was uninhabited yet occupied, or not occupied. The last option is indicating that the building is quite simply that, a building, perhaps a barn or similar. The option of uninhabited yet occupied could be temporary accommodation or perhaps squatters. Also, captured on the Census was the number of rooms at the property, if less than five.

The second adjustment is around age, it specifically asks, the age at the last birthday, presumably in an attempt to be more accurate regarding the ages of those included on the census.

The third adjustment was expanding the question around work. The original question was to ask if the individual work working or own account, the expanding element is to understand how many were working from home, in what could be described as “cottage industry”

As I looked at the Census for Wanborough I was in part surprised with the way the family had spread. Indeed the extended family was very much of importance.

Wanborough Census 1901 – RG13/607/66/2 Surrey History Centre

Granny, Annie Prudence is now married to my great Grandfather Charles Butcher, having married on 24 December 1898.  They are couple, with their first daughter, my late Aunt Rose who was aged one. Annie was aged 21 and Charles aged 29. Annie was born in Puttenham and Charles in Wonersh, Surrey. Also living with them is Annie’s brother, Edward Harris who was aged 23 and described as an agricultural labourer, Charles is recorded as a carter. The cottage the family were living in was one of Manor Farm Cottages. The family were connected to Manor Farm at Wanborough until 1930.

On the next page, we see Henry and Caroline Harris, living with their grand-daughter, Florrie Toller who was aged seven years old, and was the daughter of Henry of Caroline’s daughter, Ellen Harriet. Henry is still working, he is 56 years old and is a shepherd on a farm, likely Manor Farm at Wanborough.

Wanborough Census 1901 – RG13/607/66/3 Surrey History Centre

One of the things I pondered on was where Charles Butcher was in 1891. I feel that having been researching for so long, I should have known, and perhaps I had known, but forgot – who knows!  In 1891 Charles Butcher (born 1869) was living with his father, Charles and step mother Francis A, and some half siblings. They were living in Alfold, Surrey. Charles was aged 66 years old and his second wife, was aged 40.

More on Charles senior in the future, as well as the continual connections with others, and lastly, the connection with the Butcher family in Alfold, with whom there is already a connection within the family.

“Drawing” of location of occupants at Wanborough circa 1905 – Julie Goucher Collection 1990

As I looked through the census pages for Wanborough in 1901, I am recognising the surnames named by my late great Aunts, the Spicer’s, Strudwick’s, Chennel’s.

With apologies for my poor art skills. This was drawn out with the help of two Aunts, as I wanted to get a feel of who lived where. The property marked APH is where my great grandparents, Annie Prudence (Harris) and her husband, Charles Butcher.

Posted in Census, Ellis, Genealogy, Harris, Puttenham & Wanborough, Surnames, UK & Ireland (Eire) Genealogy Series | Leave a comment

Census, People and Genealogy – 1891 Census

Created by Julie Goucher, 2021 using Wordscloud

Continuing with the Census, People and Genealogy series – all posts can be found HERE. There is also a Census downloadable to be found HERE.

In 1891 we remain following Henry Harris and his wife, Caroline. In the decade since the 1881 census, there have been changes to the family dynamics, with marriages, new families and deaths.

The first change is the family have left Puttenham, they have moved across the Hogs Back (A31) to Wanborough, a distance of just a few miles. The descriptive page is one of the best we have seen since this series began.

Census 1891 – Surrey History Centre RG12/562/86/1

The family are shown here, living in one of Wanborough Farm Cottages. Granny is marked by the green arrow.

Census 1891 – Surrey History Centre RG12/562/86/4

The family, in addition to Granny who is now aged 11, includes both her parents, Henry Harris who is head of the household and still a shepherd. He is aged 46 and it is indicated he is employed. My great great Grandmother, Caroline (nee Ellis) is also aged 46 with her place of birth indicated as Elstead, Surrey. Caroline is also recorded as an agricultural labourer.

There are five children in the household, which includes Granny. Her brother Henry who was known as Harry, is aged 16 and an agricultural labourer. There is another brother, Edward who also an agricultural labourer and is aged 13 years. The youngest two daughters are also in the family home, Kate A, was actually Alice Kate, but always known as Kate, she was aged nine with the youngest, Mabel aged six, both were recorded as scholars, as was Granny.

Wanborough is frequently twinned with Puttenham, and whilst I knew the family association with Wanborough existed, I can hear my Great Aunt telling me that anything before 1930 was Manor Farm at Wanborough, I had not appreciated that the association had begun as far back as 1891 until I began writing this series, which really is an example of why revisiting earlier research is always time well spent.

As I shared yesterday, Henry and Caroline had ten children altogether, in 1891 there was only five living in the family home, so where were the others, all of whom were born in Puttenham?

  • Emma Jane who was the eldest, born before her parents married in 1864.
  • George William born in 1866
  • Mary born in 1867
  • Ellen Harriet born in 1870
  • Rose born in 1873
  1. Emma Jane married William Arthur West in 1897. They raised two children, one of whom died during the First World War. Emma and William settled in Stony Stratford on the Buckinghamshire/Oxfordshire border.
  2. George William had married in 1895 and was living close to his wife’s family, elsewhere in Surrey
  3. Mary married into a branch of the Marshall family and remained living in Puttenham until her death in 1902.
  4. Ellen Harriet married George Dowsett Toller of Illford in Essex. They settled there and had nine children of whom one died. Sadly, by 1916 they were to loose another.
  5. Rose married Richard Cresswell in 1900 in Wanborough. Richard worked on the railways, they raised two children and settled on the south coast in Sussex.

More on these folks in the months ahead, as I get the records updated and expanded. To conclude, here is one of my favourite and treasured photographs – Caroline (called Carrie) and four of her girls, Granny, Annie Prudence is on the far left, then Mabel, Rose and Kate.

Caroline Harris (nee Ellis) sitting with daughters (left to right) Annie Prudence, Mabel, Rose and Kate
Copyright from the personal collection of Julie Goucher

Posted in Census, Ellis, Genealogy, Harris, One-Place Studies, Puttenham & Wanborough, UK & Ireland (Eire) Genealogy Series | Leave a comment

Census, People and Genealogy – 1881 Census

Created by Julie Goucher, 2021 using Wordscloud

Continuing with the Census, People and Genealogy series – all posts can be found HERE. There is also a Census downloadable to be found HERE.

The page at the start of the census for the parish is not the most descriptive we have seen.

Puttenham 1881 Census – Surrey History Centre – RG11; Piece: 780; Folio: 86; Page: 1

The 1881 Census was the one that began my genealogical and family history journey. It is well documented on this site that I grew up visiting and listening to my great aunts and uncles – the siblings of my maternal Grandparents. The 1881 census shows my Great Grandmother, Annie Prudence Harris.

Puttenham 1881 Census – Surrey History Centre – RG11; Piece: 780; Folio: 86; Page: 7

Annie is marked with the green arrow. I remember being a little 3 year old, snuggling up to Granny, as all of us called her. It was seeing Granny on this census that was just magical to me; the linking of the person that I remembered to the past. In turn, that created the urge to understand, and get to know these people that I shared a genetic link to.

In 1881, Henry Harris is shown a shepherd, he is aged 37 and born in Headley Hampshire. He is head of the household and unsurprisingly, living with his wife, Caroline who is aged 36. Also there are six children, the youngest of which is Annie P who is my Great grandmother.

Henry and Caroline had ten children, the first two daughters were not living with the family and the two children who were born after Granny were not obviously born as yet. The details gathered during this census was the same as the previous one, there would not be a change to the details until the early 20th Century,

The oldest child, Emma Jane was born to Caroline and Henry before they married, but she was part of the family, considered and loved as such. Emma was aged 17 in 1881. She was a domestic servant, living at Home Farm in Shackleford, which is just a few miles from Puttenham. Home Farm was occupied by Henry Plummer and his wife, and their one year old son, and was a farm of 330 acres, employing 13 labourers and two boys.

Daughter Mary who was the second daughter, but third child born to Henry and Caroline was born in Puttenham in 1867. Mary, who was known as Polly was living away from home, although still in the village. She was aged 13 in 1881, employed as a domestic servant in the home of John Shrubb, who was a farmer with 100 acres who employed five men and two boys.

Posted in Census, Ellis, Genealogy, Harris, UK & Ireland (Eire) Genealogy Series | Leave a comment

Census, People and Genealogy – 1871 Census

Created by Julie Goucher, 2021 using Wordscloud

Continuing with the Census, People and Genealogy series – all posts can be found HERE. There is also a Census downloadable to be found HERE.

We see in the 1871 Census an increase in the description of the village and properties included in the census. In this instance it shows the order of the properties included.

Puttenham 1871 Census – Surrey History Centre – RG10; Piece: 815; Folio: 83; Page: 1

Puttenham 1871 Census – Surrey History Centre – RG10; Piece: 815; Folio: 83; Page: 12

In the family details we see several changes –

George Ellis (the line in yellow on the image above) has not remarried and is still recorded as a widower. He is aged 60 and working as an agricultural labourer. His place of birth is Guildford in Surrey. He is residing in The Street in Puttenham and in the household of his daughter, Caroline who was born in 1844 and her husband, Henry Harris. They have four children, my late Great grandmother has not yet been born, and would not be for another eight years.

Caroline (nee Ellis) and Henry Harris on their 60th Wedding anniversary – from the personal collection of Julie Goucher

I thought that I would share this photograph of Henry Harris and Caroline, formerly Ellis. This was taken by late Great Aunt when Caroline and Henry celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary in 1924.

Posted in Census, Ellis, Genealogy, Harris, Puttenham & Wanborough, Surnames, UK & Ireland (Eire) Genealogy Series | Leave a comment

Census, People and Genealogy – 1861 Census

Created by Julie Goucher, 2021 using Wordscloud

Continuing with the Census, People and Genealogy series – all posts can be found HERE. There is also a Census downloadable to be found HERE.

At the beginning of the census is the description of the parish. It does give some additional information, as it names the additional corners of the village, by naming three areas – Gadwick, Shoelands and Rodsall.

Census Returns of England and Wales, 1861 – Surrey History Centre

Over the last few days we have followed the family of George Ellis and his wife Prudence, formerly Budd. By 1861 there has been a significant change in the family and it’s dynamics.

Census Returns of England and Wales, 1861 – Surrey History Centre

The family are still living in Puttenham, and although the document does not state it on this page, further towards the start of the census the address is recorded as The Street.

George is now a widower, aged 51 years and says he was born in Guildford. If we remember back to the 1841 Census he is reported to have been born outside of the county of Surrey, which is where Guildford is. In the 1851 Census he is reported as being born in Kent. George is still an agricultural labourer.

Also living with George is son William, daughter Caroline, who is my great great Grandmother and the youngest son Edward.

Posted in Census, Ellis, Genealogy, One-Place Studies, Puttenham & Wanborough, UK & Ireland (Eire) Genealogy Series | Leave a comment

Census, People and Genealogy – 1851 Census

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The 1851 Census moved on from the questions asked in the 1841 Census. As we can see, there is not much improvement in the description of the parish recorded at the start of the 1851 Census.

Census Returns of England and Wales, 1851.

There was additional questions asked of parishioners in the 1851 Census.

Census Returns of England and Wales, 1851.

The family we met yesterday in 1841 are now featured here, indicated by the * (red astrix). The family are listed as they were in 1841, although the family is a bit bigger, with the addition of three children, including my great great Grandmother Caroline who was born in 1844.

  • Place – in this case it is recorded as “the street”
  • Houses – this is either uninhabited or a building, or the second option is inhabited which this one is
  • Names of those who were inhabiting the property on the night of the census
    • George Ellis
    • Prudence Ellis
    • George Ellis
    • Harriott Ellis
    • Frederick Ellis
    • Caroline Ellis
    • MaryAnne Ellis
    • Edward Ellis
  • Age and sex (gender) – the age the enumerator was provided was “accurate” age – what he was told, which may or may not be accurate.
  • Profession, or trade – in this case, George is described as an “ag lab”
  • Where born –
  • Whether born blind, or deaf and dumb

In terms of data consistency, George in 1841 was shown as born outside the county of Surrey. In 1851 George was reported as being born in Dover Barracks, Kent.

The line indicated by a yellow arrow is pointing to the line below the family. It that household there was just one individual, Richard Budd who is recorded as married and aged 78 years of age. The household is recorded as number 23 on the schedule which is the same as the Ellis family, although Richard’s home is referenced as one house. I took this to mean that whilst the Ellis and Budd’s were living on the same plot of land, they were residing in two distinct properties. Richard Budd was Prudence’s father.

Posted in Budd, Census, Ellis, Genealogy, One-Place Studies, Puttenham & Wanborough, UK & Ireland (Eire) Genealogy Series | Leave a comment

Census, People and Genealogy – 1841 Census

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As we sit to search for our family members on the various census it can be quite easy to scroll through, not looking at anything but the surnames, but at the beginning of the Census for each location there is a description box, such as this one shown below. As they go, the description of the village of Puttenham is significantly on the light side, and that very much depends on the enumerator of the day.

Puttenham Census 1841 – Surrey History Centre SRY HO107/1073/8

The image you can see below is from the 1841 Census for the village of Puttenham in Surrey. It details my great, great, great Grandparents – George Ellis and Prudence Budd.

Puttenham Census 1841 – Surrey History Centre SRY HO107/1073/8

As you can see, the data recorded (from left to right) is:

  • Place – in this case it is recorded as “the street”
  • Houses – this is either uninhabited or a building, or the second option is inhabited which this one is
  • Names of those who were inhabiting the property on the night of the census
    • George Ellis
    • Prudence Ellis
    • George Ellis
    • Harriott Ellis
    • Frederick Ellis
  • Age and sex (gender) – the age was a rounded number, so 14 was rounded to 15, but in this instance, the enumerator provided the “accurate” age – what he was told, which may or may not be accurate.
  • Profession, or trade – in this case, George is described as an “ag lab”
  • Where born – in county or Scotland, Ireland or foreign parts. In this case, George Ellis is recorded as being born outside of the Country of Surrey.

Whilst the 1841 Census is limited in data, it is the first time we see family groups recorded by household. Tomorrow, we look at the 1851 Census and follow George, Prudence and their family.

Posted in Budd, Census, Ellis, Genealogy, One-Place Studies, Puttenham & Wanborough, Surnames, UK & Ireland (Eire) Genealogy Series | Leave a comment