Q & A – Practicalities of a One-Name Studies Course

Q & A

Created by Julie Goucher – Feb 2020 Using Wordclouds.com

Having been offline for a week or so due to being unwell, I am working through my inbox….

Hi Julie – I am considering signing up for the new course for ONS, when is the next date?

The course took a while to write and having run in early March there are a few tweaks I want to make before it runs again. Whilst there is a date provisionally scheduled, that is for 2021.

If anyone wants to register their interest with Pharos please do so and there is scope for it to run in the Autumn (fall) providing the Pharos provisions are available – to register your interest click HERE

Posted in One-Name Studies, Pharos - Practicalities of a One-Name Studies Course | 3 Comments

Farnham Papers – Removal Orders (2)

Farnham Papers (3)

Created by Julie Goucher using Wordclouds.com May 2020

  • Elizabeth WINTER Single woman from Frensham – 1 April 1769
  • Sarah STENT, otherwise WICKS, Single women from St Mary’s Reading (Berkshire) – 21 July 1773
  • John BOXALL and Children
    • Daniel aged 8
    • David aged 5
    • George age 2  – all from Frensham, Surrey – 15 July 1775
  • James BRIDGER and Margaret his wife with children
    • Sarah aged 12
    • Elizabeth aged 10
    • Thomas aged 8
    • Jane aged 4
    • Lan aged 10 months  – all to Frensham Surrey – 25 September 1777
  • Ralph HARRIS and Sarah his wife with one child, Edward from Lingfield Surrey – 16 July 1778
  • Thomas BEAGLEY and Elizabeth his wife, as well as their two children, Elizabeth aged 11 and Thomas age 9. To Wield, Southampton – 21 January 1780
  • Robert BAIGENT, Ann his wife and son Robert. From Crondall – 7 November 1780
  • William HARDING to Peperharrow Surrey – 14 November 1780
  • Thomas SMITH and Joanne his wife, to Frensham – 5 April 1781

Reference Points:

  1. Where the reference states to, that means from Farnham to that parish
  2. Where the reference states from, that means removal from that parish to Farnham.
Posted in England, Farnham Papers (October 1988), UK & Ireland (Eire) Genealogy Series | Leave a comment

Farnham Papers – Removal Orders (1)

Farnham Papers (3)

Created by Julie Goucher using Wordclouds.com May 2020

  • John STOVOLD and wife (unnamed), and four children to Seale Surrey – 29 March 1694/5
  • James SPREADBOROUGH and wife (unnamed) to Dogmersfield, Southampton – 16 January 1700/1 (Dogmersfield is close to the Surrey/Hampshire Border, whilst recorded as Southampton, that is the name by which the County was known, as opposed to Hampshire)
  • John SPREADBOROUGH (aged 8), David SPREADBOROUGH (aged 5) sons of John from Stoke next Guildford – 16 May 1713
  • Sarah WEST, Quaker, to Crondall, Southampton – 1 March 1738/9
  • Mary EARLE (widow), and children:
    • Mary aged 10
    • Sarah aged 7
    • Ann aged 5
    • Thomas aged 2 1/2  all resident in Farnham and taken into care – 27 October 1742
  • Hannah STOVOLL, Single Women, Removal to Ash Surrey – 30 December 1742
  • Henry BAIGENT and Mary his wife, along with two children
    • Henry aged 4
    • George aged 2 – All to be removed to Froil Southampton – 26 November 1757
  • Judith CHITTY, Spinster and single women to Ash Surrey – 30 December 1742
  • Jane HARRIS, aged 5 a bastard of the body of Elizabeth HARRIS, single women, deceased to Crondall Southampton – 24 December 1767
  • William LARBY and Jane his wife from Frimley Surrey – 8 August 1768

Reference Points:

  1. Where the reference states to, that means from Farnham to that parish
  2. Where the reference states from, that means removal from that parish to Farnham.
Posted in England, Farnham Papers (October 1988), UK & Ireland (Eire) Genealogy Series | Leave a comment

Farnham Papers

Farnham Papers (3)

Created by Julie Goucher using Wordclouds.com May 2020

Back in 1988, I visited Farnham library. The attraction was not the rows and rows of books, but the collection of locally held material for Removal & Settlement documents. This material was of course copies, with the originals located at the Records Office.

At that time, Surrey material was held across several locations, Surrey Records Office at Kingston upon Thames, The Muniment Room at Guildford, which was located as part of the Museum and the local studies facility located at Guildford Library.

Farnham Papers 1988

Original notes taken 4 October 1988 – Julie Goucher

So, there I sat with the copies of the originals searching for a particular family. A particular family that was not easily spotted. It was not a wasted journey, because I extracted a number of other entries.

It is those entries that I am going to share, under the subject of Farnham Papers which you can access HERE. The movement of people who needed the support of their respective parish. I have glanced through the extracted entries and find that most of these entries are between towns in Surrey and Hampshire, although there are examples from parishes across London, Buckinghamshire, Sussex, Berkshire, and Essex.

These are just examples from the extractions I took and are not exhaustive. Surrey History Centre Catalogue is available HERE.

Posted in Farnham Papers (October 1988), Genealogy | Leave a comment

Settlement and Removal – UK and Ireland Genealogy Series

UK and Ireland Series

Created using Wordclouds.com by Julie Goucher January 2020

In 1662 a law of Settlement and Removal was introduced in England and Wales. This enabled Overseers of the Poor to remove those individuals and families from a parish if they would become a burden on the parish, regardless of there family status.

The local Justice of the Peace undertook an Examination to discover if the individual was entitled to legally settle.

Settlement was typically established by birth, although from 1691, there was an extension to that arrangement, whereby, there were other opportunities for Settlement to be granted, which are outlined below:

  • Marriage with a “native” of the Parish
  • Apprenticeship
  • Employment in the Parish for a full year
  • Contribution to Parish rates or
  • Residence at a property worth at least £10 a year, whichever was the latest.

If none of these could be met, then the Parish Overseers were compelled to return them to the last place of legal settlement.

Those that undertook temporary settlement for work, such as labouring during the harvest would need to provide confirmation to the parish that their parish of settlement would indeed provide for the individual or family.

This process lasted until 1834, though was subject to various amendments prior to 1834. The Office of Parish Overseers was abolished in 1927.

Posted in England, Genealogy, UK & Ireland (Eire) Genealogy Series, Wales | Leave a comment

Poor Law Acts – UK and Ireland Genealogy Series

UK and Ireland Series

Created using Wordclouds.com by Julie Goucher January 2020

As we continue with this occasional series featuring UK and Ireland Genealogy, we are going to look at the various Poor Law Acts.

  • Poor Law Act 1601
  • Settlement Acts 1662, 1691 and 1697
  • Knatchbull Act 1723 (Workhouse Test)
  • Gilbert Act 1782
  • Poor Law Amendment Act 1834

Poor Relief Act 1601

This was the basis of all the Poor Law administration, right up to 1834. This Act placed the burden of the poor relief on the Parish. The Act also outlined that between 2 and 4 householders, who were seen as “substantial” were to be appointed each year as Overseers of the Poor.

The Overseers raised taxes which were essential for the providing of the relief measures and not too surprisingly, the Overseers were required to keep accounts of the funds etc gathered during their time operating as such. The Overseers were the individuals who conducted various examinations, such as Settlement Examinations and provided the Settlement Certificate or Removal Order as appropriate, amongst other elements of Poor Law work.

Posted in England, Genealogy, UK & Ireland (Eire) Genealogy Series, Wales | Leave a comment

Guild of One-Name Studies Seminar – On the Wrong Side of the Law Seminar 16 May 2020

Criminal Image

Courtesy of Forbes.com

The Guild of One-Name Studies, as part of it’s educational remit as a Charity registered in England and Wales usually organises four seminars a year.

Given the COVID-19 situation the May 2020 seminar has been cancelled, however, the Guild has decided to offer a selection of presentations online.

These will be available to all, FREE of charge for a week from 10 am on Saturday 16 May 2020 British Summer Time. After the week, the presentations will be available to members of the Guild of One-Name Studies only.

The provisional programme can be found HERE. If you want to share any points about the sessions as you watch, then please do so, using the #GuildCriminal on social media.

Posted in Genealogical Resources, Genealogy, One-Name Studies | Leave a comment

Victory in Europe – #VEDay2020

I spent a lot of time yesterday thinking about my Grandparents and in particular my maternal Grandparents; George Butcher (1908-1974) and Lilian Edith Matthews (1912-1995).

The United Kingdom declared war on Germany on 3rd September 1939. My Grandparents married at Guildford Registry Office on 4th November 1939. I don’t know if they had planned that date originally, or whether they acted because of the war and the uncertainty that laid ahead. They are both on the 1939 Register, though living separately, George with his parents and several of his siblings (and including their spouses) at Manor Farm, Guildford and Lilian who was living with her sister, brother in law and their three children.

By 1939, my Grandmother, known as Lil had lost both of her parents. She was close though to her older sister Elsie and the same could be said of her sister in laws, the sisters of my Grandfather – Dorothy (known as Doll), Rose, Ellen (known as Nell), Gladys and Marjorie (known as Marge, who had married my Grandmother’s brother). My Grandfather’s parents were also alive. Despite that, the witnesses to my Grandparents wedding were friends and I know that at least my Great Aunts Doll and Elsie were there. No photographs exist of their special day.

George Butcher (1908 - 1974)

George Butcher in Sierra Leone circa 1942

On 12 December 1940, my Grandfather enlisted in the army. He was 32 years old and my Grandmother was almost 28). My Grandfather was posted to Sierra Leone in West Africa in 1941 where he remained until November 1943. He then served on home soil until July 1944 when he was posted to north west Europe, remaining there until 29 November 1945 when he returned to the UK. He was demobbed in March 1946. My late Mum, their only child was born in February 1947.

I spent time pondering how did my Grandparents adjust? Did they have to get to know one another again? What and where did he serve in north west Europe? Whilst I have some clues, I do need to explore the war diaries to gain better insight.

765d2-lilian2bedith2baged2b21

Lilian Edith Matthews on her 21st Birthday in 1933

During the war my Grandmother had worked at the laundary in Guildford where they dealt with the washing from the Army barracks there. She also had at least two evacuees, one of which kept in contact with my Grandparents long after the war ended. In fact that relationship continued to my Mum and to me, only ceasing when Joyce (evacuee) and her husband passed away. Joyce always referred to my Grandparents as Aunt and Uncle indicating their respect for my Grandparents. Joyce was provided as a middle name to my Mum as a way of showing love and affection. A special thing out of the brutality of war.

I am very proud of the contributions my Grandparents made to the war effort and the sacrifices they made, by answering the call of war and putting their new married life on hold, a story replicated many, many times over by others.

The Butcher surname was registered by me with the Guild of One-Name Studies in 2016.

Posted in Butcher One-Name Study, Genealogy, George's War, Matthews, Surnames | 3 Comments

Pursuing Surnames:Undertaking a One-Name Study

logo

Courtesy of the Society of Genealogists

Sadly, due to the Covid-19 Pandemic, my Surname talks to be held at the Society of Genealogists on 16th May 2020 has been postponed. Instead, the talks will take place online on Wednesday 3rd June 2020 at 2 pm British Summer Time (BST) for the first presentation and at 5 pm (BST) for the second talk.

Here is the details from the Society of Genealogists website:

In this first presentation, Julie Goucher will deliver an overview of what a One-Name Study is and why one is of benefit to family historians. We delve into the history of surnames in general, types of surnames and any differences in relation to non-British surnames. We also explore considerations of why some surnames may change, overtime as well as variations and deviations.

In the second presentation of the day, we spend some time looking at the foundations and practicalities of building a study, collecting data, surname distribution and analysing information. We then look at the considerations in keeping a study and what you can do next to advance your quest in pursuing surnames.

You can book this first presentation HERE and the second presentation HERE.

Posted in Genealogy, One-Name Studies, Presentations | Leave a comment

Pursuing Surnames:The History of Surnames & The Benefits of a One-Name Study

logo

Courtesy of the Society of Genealogists

Sadly, due to the Covid-19 Pandemic, my Surname talks to be held at the Society of Genealogists on 16th May 2020 has been postponed. Instead, the talks will take place online on Wednesday 3rd June 2020 at 2 pm British Summer Time (BST) for the first presentation and at 5 pm (BST) for the second talk.

Here is the details from the Society of Genealogists website:

In this first presentation, Julie Goucher will deliver an overview of what a One-Name Study is and why one is of benefit to family historians. We delve into the history of surnames in general, types of surnames and any differences in relation to non-British surnames. We also explore considerations of why some surnames may change, overtime as well as variations and deviations.

In the second presentation of the day, we spend some time looking at the foundations and practicalities of building a study, collecting data, surname distribution and analysing information. We then look at the considerations in keeping a study and what you can do next to advance your quest in pursuing surnames.

You can book this first presentation HERE and the second presentation HERE.

Posted in Genealogy, One-Name Studies, Presentations | Leave a comment