Researching Surnames Guide – Readalong

Cover for Surname bookletBeginning 1 September 2020, I am offering a read-a-long of this booklet, coupled with discussion.

The booklet will be read over 3 weeks and then discussed over alternating weeks.

Here is the schedule:

  • 1 September 2020 reading pages 1-15 (A)
  • 8 September 2020 online discussion via Zoom (A)
  • 7 September 2020 reading pages 15-25 (B)
  • 15 September 2020 online discussion via Zoom (B)
  • 14 September 2020 reading pages 26-38 (C)
  • 22 September 2020 online discussion via Zoom (C)

There is opportunity to follow up on the discussions and learning as the Pharos surnames course, Practicalities of a One-Name Study, begins on 6th October 2020. The next Introduction to One-Name Studies course is in February 2021.

The booklet is available to Guild of One-Name Studies members free of charge in PDF format or can be purchased from the Guild HERE (100% of all purchases support the Guild)

Places for this read-a-long will be limited and available to all. They are free of charge. Depending on the interest, there may not be another opportunity to take part.

If you would like to take part please let me know, by completing the form below:

 

Posted in Genealogy, Introduction to One-Name Studies (Pharos course 901), One-Name Studies, Practicalities of a One-Name Studies (Pharos Course 903) | Leave a comment

Desk Ramblings (29)

Desk Ramblings

Created by Julie Goucher, July 2019

The last Desk Ramblings post, which you can read HERE, was written as the UK went into COVID-19 lock-down, on 26 March. Since then it has been a strange time to be living in and I wonder what historians of the future will make of it?

Whilst some found the last 4 months a challenge, I was not especially bothered by not going out and about. We kept our interactions with others to a minimum, at least in the physical sense, despite that I still managed to be unwell, but am on the mend now. I taught two Pharos courses during  the period of March to July, the first running of the Practicalities of a One-Name Study and then an Introduction to One-Name Studies.

On a personal note, I decided to work through the online catalogues of a number of venues relating to my One-Name Studies. I started with West Sussex Records Office and whereas I expected to be able to conclude the whole of Sussex and Surrey, I have only managed to complete West Sussex. I also managed to watch a Society of Genealogists recording, Treasures of the Society of Genealogists, which was immensely helpful. I lectured twice during June to the Society of Genealogists, about Surnames, plus to a genealogical Society in the United States. I also wrote three presentations, one of which will be presented a bit later this month.

Readers may remember that I mentioned on the last Desk Ramblings that I was about to start a Moleskine Expanded notebook, which has 400 pages, well I did start it and finished it, the notebook did me the entire period of lock down, so that was well timed! Here is a brief snapshot:

Moleskine Expanded 1

As you can see here, I use quite a lot of those tabs of what material is located where. Moleskine does not have a index page, nor are there page numbers. For the first time in years, I did not leave space at the beginning of the book, in essence, I winged it. This book contains a host of material, journal entries, notes and research material. In a strange way, the lack of page numbers and an index did not, and has not prohibited me from locating material. My current notebook is the slimmer Moleskine, but I have another expanded lined up ready and waiting.

I note that I have a few posts completed, but not scheduled for two previous series, I shall complete these posts get them up this week. It is ironic, that having been home for the best part of more than four months, I still have outstanding tasks.

I have scheduled a Read-a-Long of the Surname Research Guide, which you can read about, and sign up HERE. The booklet is not a long read, but the concept of a group read was to bring together those who might be curious about surnames and want to focus on reading and discussion. We all have surnames, yet having a surname specific study is seen as unusual.

I hope everyone has been well and safe, stay tuned for more frequent posting.

Posted in Desk Ramblings!, Stationary,Filofax, Journals & Notebooks | 1 Comment

Q & A – Which Pharos One-Name Studies course should I take first?

Q & A

Created by Julie Goucher – Feb 2020 Using Wordclouds.com

This morning I received the following question:

Julie, I recently joined the Guild of One-Name Studies having listened to your online lecture with the Society of Genealogists. I want to take part in the readalong, but I am not sure what Pharos course I should do first?

 Thanks for your question. Historically there was two courses offered by Pharos, the Introduction to One-Name Studies course and the Advanced One-Name Studies course. When I took over teaching the Introduction course, I began keeping a note of questions that I was asked by students, some with a great deal of frequency. Those notes eventually found themselves turned into the Practicalities of a ONS course which ran for the first time in March.

In a perfect world, the Practicalities course would follow the Introduction course, and in the main that does happen, but it is not an issue for students to take the practical course first. The course outline shows that the Introduction course is focused on the foundations of a study, whereas the Practicalities course has the focus on the practical elements of a study, but there is a bit of overlap between the courses, because elements of the beginnings of a study do overlap.

That said, over the last almost four years I have taught students whose studies have been up and running for a number of years, as some want to revisit elements of their studies and expand their knowledge. Some students have been focused on other matters and want to refresh their knowledge etc. In much the same way as there is no right or wrong way to work on a study, there is no right or wrong way to take the One-Name Studies courses, they are seeking to provide layered learning.

It is not just the formal learning of the courses, the networking between students is actually lovely to see develop and that very much follows the ethos of the Guild, members helping members. I am consider myself very lucky in that I get to interact with members of the Guild and genealogists, teach what I find absolutely fascinating and to spread the word about surnames.

I hope that helps and I will see you on the Readalong. I have a number of posts to share here in the coming days, so I have pinned the Readalong post to the front page of anglersrest.net In the meantime, do read the numerous surname posts HERE, and the course descriptions of the Pharos courses, the links appear on the right hand side of the this site or on the Pharos website.

Posted in Introduction to One-Name Studies (Pharos course 901), One-Name Studies, Practicalities of a One-Name Studies (Pharos Course 903), Q & A | Leave a comment

Introduction to One-Name Studies Course – Lesson Five

Pharos Lessons

Copyright – Julie Goucher 2020

The fifth lesson of the Pharos Introduction to One-Name Studies course has just been sent to students.

Our fourth chat session will take place a little later this week, please check the Pharos forum for details and the link.

This is the last lesson of this Introduction course, although the chats and conversations continue.

For more details about the Practicalities of a One-Name Studies course (903) and the Advanced course (902), confirmation of the forthcoming dates and to book please visit the information pages HERE.

Posted in Introduction to One-Name Studies (Pharos course 901), One-Name Studies | Leave a comment

Stationary Memories – Biddles of Guildford

BiddlesofGuildfordThis morning I went online for my Twitter fix and noticed a post from a stationary shop of my childhood, Biddles in Guildford. Instantly I was plunged back into a series of happy memories. This shop undoubtedly helped me develop a love of stationary which has remained to this day, and a trip home to Guildford is never complete without a trip into Biddles.

Like many businesses, the COVID-19 situation has affected Biddles, but I was genuinely very sad that the business went into Administration earlier this year. Now there is a Crowdfounder project which is seeking to keep the business and save the jobs of the former staff members.

If you wish to donate to the project then you can do so HERE

Posted in Stationary,Filofax, Journals & Notebooks | Leave a comment

European Ancestors – British in Russia (Part 10)

Russian Flag

Russian Flag courtesy of Wikipedia

This post is part of a series of 10 posts about the British Community in Russia. You can read the complete series HERE

Researching Russian Surnames

When researching European families it is sometimes much easier to focus on the surname of the family or the place the family lived. The first broad piece of research I recommend, is to visit a surname distribution mapping site, which is the first link below, (in fact I recommend that for all surnames):

Surnames in Russia have a format of three components which is quite tricky to understand. Firstly there is a first name, then a middle name or Patronymic name and then finally a surname. The full name is used in formal situations, especially when in written form. We will come back to Patronymic names later on, in this post.

Surnames came to Russia late when compared to the majority of Europe. The Russian Census of 1897 showed that 75% of the Russian Empire did not have surnames. After the Revolution in 1917 people were to take surnames.

Agricultural Russia existed until 1861 with peasant Serfs. These were labourers who  very few rights and they were obligated to work on their Lord’s fields and lands. They paid a monthly fee for wheat and other commodities. As Lord’s sold their land, so too could the serfs. When serfdom was abolished in 1861, these peasants become free and the majority of these did not have surnames. Should they need official documents, all they needed to do was to provide the name of their village, or the name of the Lord, their name along with their occupation.

The Aristocracy in Russia had surnames around 14-15th Century. In the 17-18th Century those Russians that did have surnames,a did not inherit them from earlier generations of the family in the way we might be used to. The surnames, by and large were based on Patronymically, but they only lasted the life time of the individual.

For those that did not have surname based upon Patronymics, they likely had surnames based on nicknames, based on dwellings, physically and occupation. Surnames in Russia have a suffix of either ov, ev or in, which one is used, is dependent on the ending of the surname – does it end in a vowel or a consonant?

In Russia, women typically take the name of their husband, although since 1918 there has been no legal requirement to do so. In the modern era, women are marrying later in life and therefore retaining their maiden name.

Some surnames are descriptive of Russian wildlife, plants, places and geographical features such as church names or the names of Saints. Some surnames are reflective of the old Pagan Slavic names of the period prior to 10th Century. Names were often “negative” in characteristic, so not to tempt fate, for example the name of Stupid would be used, therefore not tempting fate of being smart.

Surnames of those that once resided in parts of Russia or the Soviet Union will have their surnames recorded in that fashion, as recorded by the 19th and 20th Century Russian civil servants. There are some examples of foreign surnames in Russia, from Germany, Poland, France, Ukraine, Armenian and even names from Britain.

Russian Given Names

Given names are usually traditional from the Bible or perhaps Greek, Latin or Slavic with some names applying to both male and female, with the ending of the name indicative of the gender.

Many names are diminutive, perhaps, but not always, that the name could be shorter, but the name is reflective of the emotional link between people – Pavel could become Pav – in the right setting, friends might use this format, but if Pavel was someone, with whom you had a professional relationship, it would be inappropriate.

The middle name, is based on the male Patronymic name with the addition of Ovich or Evich for male and Ovna or Evna for female. Those from other nations are typically exempt from using the three name structure, which is outlined above.

For those whose father in not know then the middle name might be the name of the Grandfather or other significant individual. Some might have different cultural emphasis on the naming structure – perhaps for a child of a French & Russian couple, the first name might be a French name with the Patronymic name representing the name of the mother or father plus the surname.

There are also options too should the name not liked, with the name being changed at the Russian passport office or a male, taking the name of his bride, rather than the other way around.

I am indebted to Pavel for his assistance and clarity in this final part of the series. You can read the complete series, of the British Community in Russia HERE.

Posted in British in Russia, European Ancestors, One-Name Studies, Russia/Soviet Union/USSR, Surname Tips, Types of Surnames | Leave a comment

European Ancestors – British in Russia (Part 9)

Russian Flag

Russian Flag courtesy of Wikipedia

This post is part of a series of 10 posts about the British Community in Russia. You can read the complete series HERE

In this post we are going to look at some further considerations:

  • Records in Russia are held locally, so it is important to know where your family were located.
  • Records involving Jewish individuals can be held in different locations compared to non-Jewish individuals
  • Basic understanding of Cyrillic alphabet
  • There is an Russian language 3 part course in the FamilySearch Wiki – Though some documents are in French, whilst others relating to the Baltic provinces of Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania are in German
  • Until the Revolution, Russia used the old Julian calendar and events took place 13 days behind the west who were using the Georgian calendar
  • Those who emigrated to other countries, including the United States from Russia likely sailed from Hamburg – read this page on the FamilySearch wiki
  • Familiarise yourself with the geography, religion, culture and language of your ancestors in Russia. That is very important and gives your research a good grounding. Furthermore, it is common that the British were able to converse in basic Russia.  Whilst many Britons remained in the British Community in Russia, it is feasible that some did integrate into the Russian community, including perhaps even having romantic liaisons!

You can read the complete series, of the British Community in Russia HERE

Posted in British in Russia, European Ancestors, Russia/Soviet Union/USSR | Leave a comment

European Ancestors – British in Russia (Part 8)

Russian Flag

Russian Flag courtesy of Wikipedia

This post is part of a series of 10 posts about the British Community in Russia. You can read the complete series HERE

The material found at Leeds University Archives was created on 25 May 1982 by the Brotherton Library and the Department of Russian Studies at Leeds University.

The collection is a really rich resource and in bringing it all together in this format enabled the archive to attract other material. The archives contain over 300 collections, ranging from single items through to significant collections. There is no original documents for the period of 16-18th Centuries, but there are some copies, in additional to large collections relating to some of the merchant dynasties.

  • Surnames in the collection relating to the 18th Century:

Bell, Call, Cazalet, Fanshawe, Hill, Hubbard, Hyam, Manners, Wishaw, Cattley

  • Surnames in the collection relating to the 19th Century:

Armitstead, Carrick, Coates, Gaubert, Howard, Johnson, McGill, Macpherson, Shanks, Smith, Swan & Swann, Thomson & Thornton

  • Surnames in the collection relating to the 20th Century:

Astbury, Atack, Barnard, Beavan, Bennett, Berney, Birse, Brooke, Brown, Cale, Carr, Carnock, Cheshire, Cottam, Crawshaw, Deacon, Everleigh, Fullard, Gibson, Hargreaves, Harris, Healey, Hilton, Hird, Hopper, Hughes, Isherwood, Jobling,Kinnear, Knox, Lunn, Mackie, Marshall, Martin, Matthews, Maude, Mirrielees, Moreley, Muir, Nicolson, Peet, Philip, Pickersgill, Ross, Sara, Seaburn, Shaw, Spearing, Stevenson, Templeton, Tong, Walcot, Wordell, Webster, White, Whitehead, Yates.

  • Additional Papers & Collections for the 20th Century:

Randsome – Writer Arthur Ransome relating to his time as a war correspondent

Paget – Lady Muriel and the staff at the Anglo Russian Hospital in Pettograd & Southern Front

Rev Frank North of St Andrew’s Church in Moscow

  • Surnames in the collection who fought in Russia as part of the Allied Intervention 1918-1920

Appleyard, Cheshire, Church, Fenton, Hayes, Hodges, Horrocks, Lumb, Mathers, Moore, Schuster, Shepherd, Smith

You can read the complete series, of the British Community in Russia HERE

Posted in British in Russia, European Ancestors, Russia/Soviet Union/USSR | Leave a comment

European Ancestors – British in Russia (Part 7)

Russian Flag

Russian Flag courtesy of Wikipedia

This post is part of a series of 10 posts about the British Community in Russia. You can read the complete series HERE

  • 18th Century births, marriages and deaths are located in either of two venues
    • The National Archives (TNA) (Kew, London)
      • Foreign Office (FO) records FO 378/3-9
      • Misc BMD Abroad 1627-1917 RG43/1
    • The Guildhall Library
  • The Anglican churches located in Russia, held under the Diocese of London can be found at the Guildhall Library. These include:
    • Moscow 1825-1962
    • Odessa & South Russia 1883-1918
    • Riga 1806-1918 (now part of Latvia, but the City was previously Russian)
  • Consular Correspondence at TNA:
    • St Petersburg 1801-1979 in series FO 181
    • Moscow 1857-1940 in series FO 447
    • Early material 1565-1780 SP 91
    • Foreign Office General Material 1781-1905 FO 65
    • Foreign Office General Material Post 1905 FO 371
    • Shipping at Kronstadt (near St Petersburg) FO 184
    • Wills of British Residents 1817-1866 FO 184
    • Baptismal Registers of the English & American Congregational Church Alexandroffsky, St Petersburg – RG33/146  – The Church was dedicated in 1840 for employees of Alexandroffsky Mechanical works & Thornton Woollen Mills
    • Burials of the German Colony also in RG33/146
  • Records of Evacuations from Russia post 1918 Series FO 371 & FO 369 which contains lists of Evacuees and might include descriptions of journeys made by some families or individuals
  • Finland Consulate Records FO 511
  • Russia was one of the few places prior to 1914 that required traveller’s to have a passport – FO 611

You can read the complete series, of the British Community in Russia HERE

Posted in British in Russia, European Ancestors, Russia/Soviet Union/USSR | Leave a comment

European Ancestors – British in Russia (Part 6)

Russian Flag

Russian Flag courtesy of Wikipedia

This post is part of a series of 10 posts about the British Community in Russia. You can read the complete series HERE

The material available in Russia is variable, as are the places where you can find it and it would be worth reading the next four posts in tandem with this one.

Data relating to Births, Marriages and Deaths and Census are kept in different archives in Russia:

  • Material relating to events pre 1790 can be located in Russian State Archives of Ancients Acts in Moscow
  • Material for the period of 1790-1920 can be found in any of the 89 regional state archives
  • Material relating to to 1920 and onwards, can be found at any of the regional ZAGS which is the local registration bureau.

The material at any of these archives is provided free of charge, but only to direct descendants. Personal files exist at specific regional and federal archives of the defunct Communist party, government institutions and Ministry of Defence.

You can read the complete series, of the British Community in Russia HERE.

Posted in British in Russia, European Ancestors, Russia/Soviet Union/USSR | Leave a comment