Advent – Day 4

Merry Christmas image – from the collection of Julie Goucher, 2021

My Grandmother always used to buy hamper coupons from the Unigate milkman, I don’t know if she received any special discount as my Grandfather had worked for them up until he retired, but she always had the coupons and then exchanged them a week or so before Christmas for a hamper. There was always lovely boxes of chocolates, biscuits, tins of ham and deserts and a shop made Christmas pudding. I am sure that there may have been a bottle of Sherry in the hamper, even though my Grandmother was not able to drink alcohol. There was also some lemonade and dilatable juices – like Robinsons, and some fruit.

Even though we had the hamper there was also other bits bought or made. The Christmas cake, and Christmas Puddings were both homemade, a delicious joint of gammon that was cooked on the stove on Christmas Eve to be consumed for Christmas Day tea time, a tin of Victoria biscuits made by McVitie’s. The biscuits no longer sold in a tin but are still available. I still buy a box each year and as I put them in the supermarket trolley I have a festive flashback to years past.

We always had Turkey for Christmas Day along with the trimmings. On Boxing Day the usual lunch meal was bubble and Squeak with either the Turkey cold or made into Rissoles. I still have the mincer that my Grandmother used and I still do some of the things that we did when I was a child, and those special moments live on for another generation.

Copyright – Julie Goucher, 2017

Mum used to make the most lovely rum truffles, with the proper stuff, not the cheap essence. Since Mum is longer here we no longer have the truffles. I have the original recipe and lots of happy memories.

Every year, this rather tatty extract from a Woman’s Realm Mag would appear. I had chance to have a proper glance at it. The recipe is from The Archer’s Country Cookbook by Martha Woodford published in 1977.

I can certainly vouch for the truffles!

4oz dark cooking chocolate
4oz icing sugar
1 egg yolk
2 tablespoons ground almonds
2 tablespoons double cream
2 tablespoons rum
chocolate vermicelli

Melt the chocolate over a basin of hot water. Beat in the icing sugar, egg yolk, almonds, cream and rum and pound altogether until mixture is smooth, and form into little balls. Roll each truffle in a little vermicelli and coat it.

Posted in Advent Posts | Leave a comment

Advent – Day 1

Merry Christmas image – from the collection of Julie Goucher, 2021

I haven’t taken part or written any advent posts in the last few years. I thought that for this year I would revisit some of those earlier posts and switch around they days they appear and in some cases make tweaks to the original posts. There are also a few posts in my draft file and whilst some of those are not Christmas related, I may well publish them, that way they will at least see the light of day!

Christmas always has its sad moments, in that we miss our deceased relatives, and yet remember with fondness and love those who have passed away.

My Grandmother, always comes to my mind because her birthday, on 18th December was a week before Christmas and this will appear elsewhere during the Advent Calendar postings. The last Christmas my Grandmother was alive she came to stay with us. My husband did lots of recordings of her, asking her questions and listening to her remembering past times. Even now, more than 20 years on I can not listen to those tapes or watch the video. When my husband transfers it to DVD which he still hasn’t done yet, he’ll do it when I am out as I still miss her dreadfully.

Then in the late 1990’s my Nephew, then aged 16 years died on 18th December as a result of a tragic accident involving another school boy. His funeral was on Christmas Eve and although I was not especially close to my Nephew, my husband was, and my thoughts always turn to him and the fact that his young life was wasted. I find it especially sad that my Nephew has been gone for longer than he was alive.

In 2010 we lost my Father in Law and whilst he was elderly, his death was unexpected. Since then we have had a number of relatives pass away, my Mum included. More recently I have had two further bereavements, both  in Australia. Firstly, my cousin’s son, he was younger than me, and the death was a surprise. Then the wife of my cousin passed. We were very close, despite the many miles and I have lost a dear, dear friend. I shall raise a glass to her on 12 December which was her birthday.

Amongst that sadness is of course joy, as each of those individuals has a special place in our hearts and we have some wonderful memories, which, when the time is right will probably appear in this blog.

May they rest in peace, in the knowledge that they are missed everyday.

Posted in Advent Posts | Leave a comment

The Really Useful Show #ReallyUsefulShow

Screen Capture of the Really Useful Showhttps://www.fhf-reallyuseful.com/

The Really Useful Show, hosted by the Family History Federation  has just gone LIVE! You can still purchase tickets, by either clicking on the link HERE or on the image above. There are lots of great talks and vendors attending the show, including the Guild of One-Name Studies and a number of societies that I am a member of….And, if that was not enough to tempt you, it is FREE 6pm-9pm GMT.

You can view my own talk, about European Ancestors also, which has a handout. I will be available over the course of the show so if you have any questions, you can either send me a chat message or reach out to me here, via the Contact Form

Posted in Genealogy, Presentations | Leave a comment

Protected: Pharos – Practicalities of a One-Name Study (903) – Zoom October 2022 Lessons 3 & 4

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Posted in Pharos Zoom Sessions | Enter your password to view comments.

Protected: Pharos – Practicalities of a One-Name Study (903) – Zoom October 2022 Practical Week

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Posted in Pharos Zoom Sessions | Enter your password to view comments.

Protected: Pharos – Practicalities of a One-Name Study (903) – Zoom October 2022 (Lessons 1 and 2)

This content is password protected. To view it please enter your password below:

Posted in Pharos Zoom Sessions | Enter your password to view comments.

European Ancestors – Migration Series (33) Linking Migration to Occupations.

European Migration Series
© Julie Goucher, August 2022

This post is part of a series about European Migration. You can read the complete series HERE.

The linking of occupations to new settlements is quite interesting. Here are some examples which are quite general:

  1. Those that left Palma in Italy were often travelling street musicians such as organ grinders often accompanied by a monkey,
  2. Others from Lucca made plaster of Paris statues
  3. Those from the south of Italy were often unskilled labourers
  4. Italians in South Wales typically came from the mountainous region of Genoa and Parma.
Posted in European Ancestors, European Migration Series, Europeans beyond Europe, Italy | Leave a comment

European Ancestors – Migration Series (32) Thinking about Migration to the USA

European Migration Series
© Julie Goucher, August 2022

This post is part of a series about European Migration. You can read the complete series HERE

People do not always migrate in straight lines. By that I mean on one continuous journey.

Researching across continental Europe is always a little tricky because of Empires and the reach of those Empires, the topic of ports, and the considerations that migrants took in choosing the port along with the destination. Finally there are the topics of wars and political influence. All of these potentially impacted the route taken as did other factors such as religion, cultural matters, and in terms of political those that were anti-establishment.

When migrating, migrants often travelled in groups, the group might be representative of family, friends or those who were from the same town etc. Choosing the ports was important, focus might have been on the cheapest versus the nearest, therefore cost was a consideration. The other consideration would’ve been the destination.

The following is a list of some of the ports which might help you:

Ports in the United States were New York, Boston, Baltimore, New Orleans, and Philadelphia, though these are not exhaustive. In UK ports were also important, from Liverpool you could sell to the United States, Canada and Australia.

Other ports in the UK Glasgow, Hull, Bristol, Plymouth, Falmouth, Padstow, Bideford, there was Cork and Belfast.

European ports were Bremen in Germany, Rotterdam in the Netherlands, Antwerp in Belgium, Hamburg in Germany, Gottberg in Sweden, Le Havre in France. In France additionally is Marseille, Boulogne and Calais.

In Italy there is Naples and Palermo there are many more ports especially on the east coast of Britain that would’ve linked up to countries like Belgium and the Netherlands.

The topic of ports is divided into two broad elements:

  • Immigrant ports
  • City of immigrants

The first group is people who travel from their home location to the port where they settle while they wait for the ship. In some cases it wasn’t about the destination it was more about securing a berth on a vessel. For some, the decision of where they were going was not made until they arrived at the port. The decision was focused on where the next ship was going, and when.

The second group looks at the immigrants themselves. The city of immigrants is more about the arrival of migrants. Effectively a ship docked, the migrants got off and they settled. There was no movement to a settlement elsewhere though that may have come in time. An early example of this is, in 1683 a group of Dutch and German migrants arrived in Philadelphia and settled in the town that is now called Germantown later migrants may well have joined that settlement or may have gone elsewhere.

Into the 19th Century, many of the migrants who settled in Philadelphia had typically arrived at another port, New York is 90 miles to the north-east.

Remaining focus on United States, we see migration in three waves:

  1. First wave was between 1820 and 1880  – by 1880 115,000 immigrants had arrived in Boston which was a third more of the population. The migrants were mainly especially between 1840 & 1850. The Irish who made up about 90% of the population, there were also smaller groups of Germans, Canadians, Scots, and those from Britain.
  2. Second wave between 1880 and 1921 – During this period the city of Boston for example doubled in size with 40% Of the residents were migrants according to the 1910 census.
  3. Third wave took place from 1965 onwards. In this period we see a significant change in the migrant groups arriving using Boston, as an example migrants came from Asia, Latin America, the Caribbean, China, Haiti, the Dominican Republic, Brazil, India, El Salvador, Vietnam is and Guatemala. What is this list may seem out of the constraints of Europe if you look at the locations you will see that those countries are very much linked to other countries within Europe who’s had empires such as India as part of the British Empire, Caribbean linking to France, Latin America linking into Spain and Portugal.

It is quite possible that migrants from Spain, Portugal, France, and Britain settled in destinations such as Latin America, Vietnam and the Caribbean and then undertake migration into the United States, effectively double migration might have time span of at least 50 or 60 years. It is during this period we see the decline of migration by boat and an increase in by plane.

During the period of 1921 to 1965 we have what is known as the restriction years. Groups such as the KKK were very much against migration of Catholic and Jews. The National Origins Act of 1924 was looking at migration through a quota system generally felt favouritism with those from England, Ireland ,and Germany.

Migration Numbers indicate in 1921 there was 800,000 migrants, by 1930 this had fallen to 150,000. It coincided with slow economic growth and by 1934 a quarter of the workers were unemployed. The Second World War at least temporarily revived the economy through shipbuilding munitions and the production of other military goods.

Post-World War II the United States is admitting War brides, Jewish refugees affected by the Holocaust, and others fleeing communism from Eastern Europe, China and Cuba.

Something else to consider is to focus on the arrival ports. as well as the departure ports,

As you can see the topic of migration and ports it’s not a small one, and the European Migration Series is going to be a long series, some of the posts might be on consecutive days, while others might be a week or so apart. The series is currently scooped out on a rather large pile of index cards, and is subject to be tweaked over the coming weeks. Different migration groups likely share commonality with other groups, regardless of the catalyst for migrating, how they migrated, when they migrated, why they migrated and where they migrated to.

The posts are going to cover a wide range of reasons, locations, timespans, individuals and resources etc. The commonality might mean there is going to be some overlap and going forward, I will attempt to keep posts short and concise.

What to do next? To get the most out of the series, or for European research guidance there are a few things I recommend:

  1. Subscribe via email, Facebook or Twitter follow, then you will be alerted to new posts when they publish
  2. Leave comments or questions on posts – I might answer questions at the bottom of the post, create a separate Q & A or do both
  3. The European Ancestors section on the menu bar has a link for this series and a variety of other posts – what is currently published is a mere fraction of what I have.
  4. Consider taking the Pharos European Ancestors course (750)
Posted in European Ancestors, European Migration Series, Europeans beyond Europe | 1 Comment

European Ancestors – Migration Series (18) – Pull Factors of Nordic Migration

European Migration Series
© Julie Goucher, August 2022

This post is part of a series about European Migration. You can read the complete series HERE.

Until the middle of the 19th Century migration from the Nordic region was reasonably small. I have divided the topic into what I have called “Push Factors” and “Pull Factors”. Some of those elements will replicate across other European countries, and that might be variable across different time periods.

The image below is taken from my notebook where I focused on specifics for this series.

If you look at the image, there is some replication between elements that were “PUSH” and “PULL”.

© Julie Goucher, 2022

The reality was people did not want to leave their family, friends and Country, but there was this need to do more, achieve more and therefore they were able to see the details from other Countries providing the opportunities they were keen to have.

There was the ability to be free, to be able to meet their religious obligations and know there was not to be any treatment that prohibited that. The promise of a better social and political structure was also a big draw.

What was probably the biggest element was around work – the ability to be able to work, to provide for themselves and family. There were areas that were attracting others from the same Country, so there was to be a sense that they were with likeminded and familiar people. The land of opportunity did exactly that, it provided opportunities to work, earn and progress. A step further, was the appeal of being able to acquire land, either freely given to new settlers or through affordable purchasing. Land Grants was a win-win, migrants to achieve what they wanted and the Country that embraced these migrants welcomed people who were going to populate the vast Countries, easing the burden on the cities.

Posted in European Ancestors, European Migration Series, Europeans beyond Europe, Nordic Region | Leave a comment

European Ancestors – Migration Series (17) – Push Factors of Nordic Migration

European Migration Series
© Julie Goucher, August 2022

This post is part of a series about European Migration. You can read the complete series HERE.

Until the middle of the 19th Century migration from the Nordic region was reasonably small. I have divided the topic into what I have called “Push Factors” and “Pull Factors”. Some of those elements will replicate across other European countries, and that might be variable across different time periods.

The image below is taken from my notebook where I focused on specifics for this series.

© Julie Goucher, 2022

Looking at the “Push Factors” it is easy to see why the option to migrate was appealing.

Land grants in countries around the world – United States, and Australia as two examples, made it possible for migrants to quite literally build a future for themselves. In the migrants native countries there was low wages and little opportunity to diversify their occupations or skills, coupled with limited  alternatives to agricultural work. Furthermore, there was also population growth, which, when coupled to the other elements, added to the “Push Factors”. There were restricted intolerance to religious practices and freedoms. Many did not like the political structures and conscription requirements to military service.

The choices of the individuals of this region were relatively limited; either remain and deal with the challenges of daily life, or take a risk and seek a new life. As we have already seen, millions decided on the latter.

Posted in European Ancestors, European Migration Series, Europeans beyond Europe, Nordic Region | Leave a comment