Non-British Surnames – Azerbaijani Surnames

Azerbaijan Flag, courtesy Wikipedia

The Azerbaijan language is included in the Turkic group of languages, which also includes, amongst others Turkish, Tatar, Kazakh, Bashkir and Uigur.

In addition, the Arabic, Persian and Islamic cultures had influence on the Azerbaijani people.

There are three components to names in Azerbaijan –  Surname, Name and Patronymic.

Female given names were associated with beauty, tenderness, kindness and sophistication, whereas male given names were associated with strength, courage and determination.

Middle names were formed in a different way, different to that of Russian and other Slavic languages. The Patronymic name of a person, that of his father does not change. Prefixes such as ovich, evich, owna, evna did not exist in Azerbaijani history, instead relate to the Soviet period. In modern times, these are used in official communications only.

The Patronymics have two forms – Ogly and Kyzy – the former means son and the latter means daughter. When the Red Army arrived in Azerbaijan in 1920, individuals were asked for their name as part of the registration process, as the name that we would associate with the surname, was essentially the name of the father, the Russians added the usual suffix to be found in Russian culture. About 80% of Azerbaijani’s have retained this, but gradually the Russian suffix is being removed.

Excluding the various endings, the pool of Russian surnames is relatively small, there are generally speaking 15 popular names and these account for 80% of the population.

  • Abbasov, Aliev, Babaev,
  • Gadzhiev, Guliev, Hasonov, Huseynov, Ibragimov, Ismailov
  • Musaev, Mamedov, Orujov,
  • Rasulov, Suleymonov, Veliev

With the name Mamedov being the most popular.

The following are a list of popular Azerbaijani Surnames

  • Abievi, Agalarov, Alekperov, Amirov, Askerov
  • Bahramov, Gambarov, Jafarov, Kasumov, Kerimov
  • Khanlarov, Mehdryev, Safaror, Vagifor

With the name being a popular adaptive form of the Arabic name Aliakbar divided into two parts – Ali (great) and Akbar (oldest).

In ancient times, locals in their entire life had at least three names, all of them different from each other

  • Children – a name given to them at birth, with a view of distinguishing one from another child.
  • Adolescent – given to a teenager by fellow villagers and dependent on characteristic traits, spiritual qualities or external characteristics
  • Name earnt in old age – names indicated by deeds, judgement, actions and behaviours over the whole life.

There are also prefixes added in a respectful manner, a degree of kinship, some of which might not be given through a connection to blood or marriage, but instead as a sign of respect.

To explore Azerbaijani surnames click HERE

A-ZChallenge.com – used with permission

This post is part of the A-Z Challenge. It is also part of my Surname Series 2022 and for those want to focus on Non-British Surnames click HERE. You can also find more surname posts HERE.

Posted in A-Z Challenge 2022 - Non-British Surnames, Azerbaijan, European Ancestors, Genealogy, Non-British Surnames, Surnames Series 2022 | 1 Comment

European Ancestors – Understanding France (6) Burials

Courtesy of Wikipedia
Flag adopted 15 Feb 1794

This post is part of a series about genealogy in France. You can read the complete series HERE.

Before 1792, there was no death registration in France. The closest record available was burial records, these were written by priests and these contained:

  • Date of the burial, written in full
  • Date of death, often written as the day before, or other indications of when the death took place
  • Burial place, churchyard, with, in some cases in the church
  • Name of deceased with occupation
  • Age of deceased
  • Name of the spouse of the deceased
    • or, if a child, the parents
  • Name of witnesses and relationship to the deceased, but this is not always provided
  • There might be an indicator if the death was sudden, or the deceased was given the last rites.

Burials were undertaken by priests and are not generally speaking a mechanism for recording the cause of death. It might be possible to potentially construct a hypothesis based upon other materials available, such as when it is known there was a significant outbreak of a particular condition or illness.

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European Ancestors – Understanding France (5) Deaths

Courtesy of Wikipedia
Flag adopted 15 Feb 1794

This post is part of a series about genealogy in France. You can read the complete series HERE.

After 1792, deaths were required to be registered by civil officials. Information was believed to be more precise than previous, and generally contained:

  • Date including the time of event
  • Date of record, including the time
  • Name of deceased
  • Age of deceased
  • Place of birth of deceased
  • Occupation (for males or unmarried women)
  • Name of spouse (and former spouses if married more than once)
    • For unmarried women, or children name of parents
  • Name of witnesses and relationship to the deceased

It is possible to find burial information in addition to the civil registration of a death.

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Q & A – Reconstructing Families Using a Mac

Created by Julie Goucher – Feb 2020 Using Wordclouds.com

I recently received an email from someone at the beginning of their One-Name or Surname Study. The email contained several questions, which I am going to split into four posts. This is post three.

Click to read Post One, Post Two

Is there any advice on reconstructing families using a Mac?

Whether you use a Mac or a Windows device, I always recommend using genealogical software. For those that listened to the recording What to look for that suits your (One-Name/Surname) Study that I gave a few weeks ago, I explained about the options available – some genealogists use Excel for genealogical trees. I am way to impatient to invest the time in making those trees using Excel. In short, use the right tool for the job, and what suits your study, and to be mindful of making the most of the time you have available for your study and further research.

There are fewer genealogical software options for those that are using Mac computers. The software options available are:

Those marked * are the most commonly used with Guild of One-Name Studies members.

My advice remains the same, take each software option for a “spin”! Download where possible, any trial offering. Seek out comments from others, the Guild has a number of members using Mac’s and they no doubt will have preferences, many were awaiting the release of Roots Magic 8 as that is now able to run without an emulator on Macs.

For those who are using a Mac and wanting to have a website hosted by the Guild as a member benefit (Members Website Project (MWP)), and to use TNG (The Next Generation) are still able to do so, as long as the genealogical program used has the capability of creating a GEDCOM.

Choosing software, and all the considerations that go along with that choice are discussed as part of the Practicalities of a One-Name Study course.

Posted in Genealogy, Introduction to One-Name Studies (Pharos course 901), One-Name Studies, Practicalities of a One-Name Studies (Pharos Course 903), Q & A, Software and Applications | Leave a comment

European Ancestors – Understanding France (10) Geographical Name Changes

Courtesy of Wikipedia
Flag adopted 15 Feb 1794

This post is part of a series about genealogy in France. You can read the complete series HERE.

During the years of the Revolution many towns changed their names, the aim was to remove signs of royalty, nobility and religion, therefore the identification of a town can be tricky to locate during this period of French history.

The new names were typically based upon geography or on the principles of the Republic, and in 1814 most towns reverted to their original name. Records are classified under the name of the town currently used and you can view this page on Wikipedia which shows the communes that changed their names.

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History For Ukraine #HistoryForUkraine

Visit the website: historyforukraine.co  – #HistoryForUkraine 🌻

To support the Ukraine Humanitarian Crisis run by the Red Cross:  https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/historyforukraine

If you missed the talk then visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qkOZesb3-0

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History For Ukraine #HistoryForUkraine – Churchill at Chartwell, Katherine Carter

Visit the website: historyforukraine.co  – #HistoryForUkraine 🌻

To support the Ukraine Humanitarian Crisis run by the Red Cross:  https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/historyforukraine

I thoroughly enjoyed this talk by Katherine Carter @KatieCulture who spoke about Churchill at Chartwell. I visited a long time ago, the house in Kent, England that Winston Churchill purchased in the 1920s. It lives on as a National Trust property, and we see the rooms just as the family had them. A revisit to Chartwell is on the schedule for the summer months.

If you missed the talk then visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qkOZesb3-0

History For Ukraine & Katherine Carter – used with permission

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History For Ukraine #HistoryForUkraine – The White Ship, Earl Charles Spencer

Visit the website: historyforukraine.co  – #HistoryForUkraine 🌻

To support the Ukraine Humanitarian Crisis run by the Red Cross:  https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/historyforukraine

I was lucky enough to be able to sit and listen to Earl Charles Spencer @CSpence1508 and his informative talk ‘The White Ship’ which was the first talk in this fundraising event, which was a thoroughly enjoyable one.

History For Ukraine & Earl Charles Spencer – used with permission

Posted in Genealogy, History, History For Ukraine #HistoryForUkraine | Leave a comment

History For Ukraine #HistoryForUkraine

Visit the website: historyforukraine.co  – #HistoryForUkraine 🌻

To support the Ukraine Humanitarian Crisis run by the Red Cross:  https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/historyforukraine

If you missed the talk then visit https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2qkOZesb3-0

Posted in Genealogy, History, History For Ukraine #HistoryForUkraine | Leave a comment

European Ancestors – Understanding France (4) (Baptisms)

Courtesy of Wikipedia
Flag adopted 15 Feb 1794

This post is part of a series about genealogy in France. You can read the complete series HERE.

Before 1792, there was no birth registration in France. The closest record available was baptism records and these contained:

  • Date of the baptisms
  • Name of Godparents, which included on occasion the occupation of male Godparents.
  • Name of Mother
    • Sometimes her father, if mother is a minor
  • Date of birth, this is often referred to as previous day or similar, rarely giving an actual date.
  • Gender of child
  • Given name
  • Names of parents
  • Occupation of father

After 1792 it is therefore possible to locate both a baptism and a birth registration.

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