A-Z Challenge 2021 – All about Surnames – Frugal Surname Research

Image designed and made available by http://www.a-to-zchallenge.com/

The online genealogical arena is overwhelmed with the provisions available to us. Whatever material I share here is a mere fraction of what is available online; and the material that is online is a fraction of the material in existence.

We are limited by our imaginations in the way we use the provisions available and where we look to get a glimmer of information to feed our genealogical habits.

The concept of a One-Name Study, or a surname project is one where the registrant with the Guild of One-Name Studies may choose to gather core material reflecting the name. Having gathered that information, there is no requirement to reconstruct families, though many do, including those with relatively large studies.

Given the registrant is seeking to locate material on a global scale, though there is no time pressures to do so, it can be costly to achieve. Today I have listed a few sites that are worthy of visiting and these are either free, or relatively low cost:

Next month I hope to share some hints and tips for using these sites to advance any research. Those pertaining to UK and Ireland will be found HERE and those relating to Continental Europe will appear HERE.

About Julie Goucher

Genealogist, Author, Presenter, native Guildfordian, avid note taker and journal writer. Lover of Books, Stationary & History; Surnames, European Ancestors, Butcher & Orlando One-Name Studies, Pharos Tutor for all One-Name Studies and surname courses.
This entry was posted in A-Z Challenge 2021 - All About Surnames, Genealogy. Bookmark the permalink.

3 Responses to A-Z Challenge 2021 – All about Surnames – Frugal Surname Research

  1. BookerTalk says:

    I find the Trove site invaluable for Australia and New Zealand

    Like

    • I love Trove, especially since it often reports information from the UK and other elements of the “Empire”. There was a significant write up about a member of my Butcher family who migrated to Tasmania in 1815. The article went on to say that a descendant migrated across to Western Australia, where he and his father and brother purchased land and several stations, which I had been unaware of.

      Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.